Overview
Students will be in an environment which focuses on engagement, collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, and inquiry.  Throughout their time at Nesbitt Discovery Academy, students will be immersed in project-based learning, allowing them to possibly develop solutions to "real-world" problems.  In addition, they will have the opportunity to establish partnerships/relationships with local businesses/industries and local colleges/universities.  
 
A Day in the Life...

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9th Grade Core Courses 
English I Honors
Math I or Math II Honors
Earth Science Honors
Physical Science
American History I Honors
PLTW--Introduction to Engineering
ACA 115 (AB Tech course)
 
10th Grade Core Courses
English II Honors
Math III Honors and Pre Calculus Honors
Biology Honors
Chemistry Honors
American History II Honors
PLTW--Principles of Engineering
PE/Health 
 
11th Grade Core Courses 
English III Honors
or
ENG 111/112
Math III Honors, Discrete Math, MAT 171, MAT 172, MAT 271
World History Honors
or
HIS 111/112
PLTW
PE/Health 
 
Elective Choices: 
CIS 110 (AB Tech Course)- All Grade Levels
PSY 150 General Psychology (AB Tech Course)- 11th and 12th Grades
SOC 210 Intro to Sociology  (AB Tech Course)- 11th and 12th Grades
MUS 110 Music Appreciation (AB Tech Course)- All Grade Levels
ART 111 Art Appreciation (AB Tech Course)- All Grade Levels
BIO 111 General Biology (AB Tech Course)- 11th and 12th Grades
BIO 112 General Biology II (AB Tech Course)- 11th and 12th Grades
Honors Genetics (NCSSM IVC)- 11th and 12th Graders
Honors Aerospace Engineering (NCSSM IVC)- 11th and 12th Grades
Principles of Health and Wellness Honors- 10th-12th Grades
Spanish I, II, III Honors- All Grade Levels 
 

Course Descriptions
 
Honors English I
Prerequisite: None
English I students will study literature, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, U.S. documents "of historical and literary significance," excerpts from an entire Shakespearean play, and art from all genres to gain knowledge of culture, current events and themselves. They will gain the reading and writing skills necessary to write, analyze and evaluate detailed arguments. By the end of English I, students will read and understand increasingly complex texts at the upper end of ninth grade reading range. Students are required to take the North Carolina Final Exam for English I. 
 
Honors English II
Prerequisite: English I
English II students will study literature, informational texts, poetry, drama, biographical works, U.S. documents "of historical and literary significance," excerpts from an entire Shakespearean play and art from the Americas (Caribbean, Central, South, and North), Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East to come to a better understanding of world cultures, contemporary issues, and their world. They will fine tune the reading and writing skills necessary to write, analyze and evaluate detailed arguments. By the end of English II, students will read and understand increasingly complex texts at the upper end of the tenth grade reading range. Students are required to take the North Carolina English II End of Course Exam.
 
Foundations of Math I
Prerequisite: None. (This course is not available to students who have passed Math I)
Foundations of Math I is designed for students who need additional preparation either before entering Math I or simultaneously with Math 1. It provides students a survey of preparatory topics for high school mathematics, including the foundations for high school algebra and geometry. Appropriate technology and tools, including manipulatives and calculators, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.
 
Math I
The focus of the foundational high school mathematics course is to increase student understanding of functions as a unifying concept in advanced mathematics. The goal is to formalize and extend prior understanding by deepening and extending student understanding of linear functions, in part by contrasting those functions with exponential and quadratic phenomena, and in part by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. In addition to studying bivariate data, students also summarize, represent, and interpret data from single measurement variables. The geometry standards in this course formalize and extend student experiences to explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout every course. Together with the content standards, these practices require that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that builds on their ability to make sense of problem situations. Students are required to take the NC End of Course Exam.
 
Math II Honors 
Math II extends student understanding of quadratic expressions, equations, and functions. Students create and solve quadratic equations using a variety of methods. They identify zeroes of quadratics using multiple representations including graphs, tables, and factoring. The critical concept of function and the ability to analyze different representations appears in multiple contexts. Functions included are power, square root, cube root, piecewise, absolute value and simple rational. The geometric strand includes experimenting with transformations in the plane and applying geometric concepts in modeling situations. Students also define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles. The link between probability and data is explored through independence, conditional and compound probability including their use in making models and evaluating decisions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout the course and prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam.
 
Math III Honors 
Math III progresses from the standards learned in Math I and II. Students extend their understanding of polynomials by exploring the relationship between zeroes and factors. Students learn and apply the Remainder Theorem. They represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically including polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential and logarithmic functions. Students use the unit circle to extend the trigonometric functions to all real numbers and model periodic phenomena. The geometric strand includes proving theorems about lines, angles, triangles, and parallelograms. Students explore similarity and congruence. They understand and apply theorems about circles. Students use statistical processes to make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout the course and prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam. 
 
Pre-Calculus Honors 
Prerequisite: Math III/Math III Honors
Pre-Calculus is an honors-level course for students preparing for AP Calculus or higher-level university mathematics. Topics include an in-depth study of trigonometry, advanced functions, analytic geometry, and data analysis. Students should expect to regularly study independently outside of class. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam.
 
Honors Earth-Environmental Science
Prerequisite: None
This course investigates the four main branches of earth science: geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. Students learn about the interrelationships among living organisms and their physical environment through laboratory activities and fieldwork. The students study how people impact their environment and how their environment influences them. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam
 
Honors Biology I 
Prerequisite: None 
Students survey the history and development of biology including an introduction to biochemistry, cellular biology, physiology, genetics, organisms, and life processes. In addition to reading, students will engage in laboratory activities to develop process and problem solving skills. Students are required to take the NC Biology End of Course Exam. 
 
Physical Science 
Prerequisite: Students should have successfully completed or be concurrently enrolled in Math I (Chemistry and Physics also meet the state physical science requirement.) 
This course is a quantitative study of matter and energy and their interactions. Topics include mechanics, optics, heat, electricity, magnetism, sound, and radiation, as well as a study of the chemical structure and composition of matter. Students will be responsible for laboratory activities and will need to be able to use mathematical formulas and equations. 
 
Honors Chemistry I 
Prerequisites: Students must have completed or be enrolled in Math II 
Students study a variety of chemistry topics including chemical equations and reactions, stoichiometry, the periodic table, atomic theory, molecular chemistry, kinetic theory, gas laws, solutions, and acid-base behavior. Students will use their mathematics and problem solving skills to complete laboratory activities. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam.
 
Honors American History I  
This course begins with the European exploration of the new world and covers American history through Reconstruction. Students will examine the historical and intellectual origins of the United States from European exploration and colonial settlement to the Revolutionary and Constitutional eras. This course will also provide students the opportunity to study the establishment of political parties, America's westward expansion, the growth of sectional conflict and the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam. 
 
Honors American History II 
Prerequisites: American History I 
This course will guide students through American history from the late nineteenth century through the early 21st century. Students will examine the political, economic, social and cultural development of the United States from the end of Reconstruction era to modern times. The desired outcome of this course is for students to develop an understanding of the cause-and-effect relationship between past and present events, recognize patterns of interactions, and understand the impact of events on the U.S. in an inter- connected world. Students are required to take the NC Final Exam.
 
PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design 
Prerequisite: None 
In this foundation Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathway to Engineering (PTE) course, students are exposed to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork, communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Students use 3D solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems and learn how to document their work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Art, English language arts, mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences. 
 
PLTW Principles of Engineering 
Prerequisite: None 
In this foundation Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pathway to Engineering (PTE) course, students survey engineering and are exposed to major concepts they will encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Students employ engineering and scientific concepts in the solution of engineering design problems. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, documenting their work and communicating solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Art, English language arts, mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course. Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.
 
ACA 115
This course provides an orientation to the campus resources and academic skills necessary to achieve educational objectives. Emphasis is placed on an exploration of facilities and services, study skills, library skills, self-assessment, wellness, goal-setting, and critical thinking. Upon completion, students should be able to manage their learning experiences to successfully meet educational goals. 
 
ART 111 Art Appreciation
This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.
 
CIS 110 
This course introduces computer concepts, including fundamental functions and operations of the computer. Topics include identification of hardware components, basic computer operations, security issues, and use of software applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role and function of computers and use the computer to solve problems. Microsoft Office will be used in this course; this includes Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in natural science/mathematics (Quantitative Option). 
 
MUS 110 Music Appreciation
This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in humanities/fine arts.
 
PSY 150 General Psychology
This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral science.
 
SOC 210 Intro to Sociology
This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies. This course has been approved to satisfy the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement general education core requirement in social/behavioral science.
 
 
 
 
 
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